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Study Examines Impact of OREF Grants

A study recently published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS) analyzed the rate at which investigators receiving certain OREF grants were able to secure funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) after receiving their OREF grant. The study compared the future funding success of NIH applicants who received OREF funding and those who did not. Additionally, the authors analyzed OREF data about all grant programs between 1994 and 2014 for the purposes of determining whether or not their was a positive correlation between receiving any OREF grant and subsequent NIH funding.

Selected highlights from the analysis are presented below. The article is available here (note that you must have a subscription to access journal content online or pay for one-time access).

OREF grant recipients subsequently receiving NIH funding also varied by OREF study type:

  • Basic – cell (n=21 or 35% vs 39 or 65% who did not receive NIH)
  • Basic – biomechanical (n=5 or 33% vs 10 or 67% who did not receive NIH)
  • Clinical (n=3 or 4% vs 43 or 96% who did not receive NIH)
  • Epidemiology (n=2 or 38% vs 8 or 62% who did not receive NIH)

Researchers from certain subspecialties are more likely to get both OREF and NIH funding. Sports medicine had the highest number of NIH grant winners, but Pediatrics had a higher proportion of NIH winners. The list below shows the number of OREF and NIH grants by subspecialty.

  • Arthroplasty: 25 OREF - 5 NIH
  • Sports Medicine: 18 OREF - 6 NIH
  • Oncology: 18 OREF - 5 NIH
  • Trauma: 17 OREF - 2 NIH
  • Pediatrics: 10 OREF - 5 NIH
  • Hand: 8 OREF - 2 NIH
  • Shoulder/Elbow: 8 OREF - 2 NIH
  • Foot/Ankle: 6 OREF - 2 NIH

Average H index at time of receiving an OREF grant was significantly higher for those who ultimately received NIH funding than those researchers who did not:

  • Avg H index at OREF who receive NIH = 15.29
  • Avg H index at OREF who do NOT receive NIH = 9.3

The average time from 1st publication to OREF grant was longer for NIH awardees than non-NIH awardees:

  • NIH funded: Average time from 1st publication to OREF grant: 12.16 years
  • Non-NIH funded: Average time from 1st publication to OREF grant: 8.26 years

USBJI Releases 3rd Edition of The Burden of Musculoskeletal Disease in the United States

The United States Bone and Joint Initiative (USBJI) recently released the 3rd edition of its landmark analysis of the impact of musculoskeletal disease in the United States. The comprehensive report examines the physical and economic cost of musculoskeletal disease and injury and is widely referenced by individuals and institutions engaged in research, education and healthcare policy.

Click here to access the 3rd edition of The Burden of Musculoskeletal Disease in the United States.